Chart of the week #30: How well do teachers understand what they are teaching?

Last time we looked at data that showed how Tanzanian teachers really are on a “cold strike” (mgomo baridi). This time, a simple question: do teachers really understand what they are supposed to be teaching.

The same World Bank Service Delivery Indicators initiative asked grade 4 teachers (known as Standard 4 in Tanzania) in Kenya, Senegal, Tanzania and Uganda to take tests based on the primary school curriculum. Essentially, they were asking how well the teachers understand the subjects they are teaching. Continue reading

Is there a contractual obstacle preventing TPDC from providing gas contracts to parliament?

From The Citizen, 7/11/14

From The Citizen, 7/11/14

Prof Sospeter Muhongo, Tanzania’s Minister of Energy and Minerals, speaking in parliament last week, said that there was no way his ministry would submit gas contracts to the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) of parliament. This is despite the PAC having repeatedly requested the Tanzanian Petroleum Development Corporation (TPDC) to provide copies of the 26 Production Sharing Agreements (PSAs) the government has signed with oil and gas exploration companies. And despite the arrest (briefly) of the TPDC Chair and acting Executive Director for refusing to comply, on the orders of the PAC chair, Zitto Kabwe.

Here’s what Prof Muhongo said:

“We have to adhere to government regulations. We cannot subject the contracts to public discussions, because they are regulations in place governing them. Even contracts between individuals, like yourself and somebody else must be governed by certain rules.”

Continue reading

Chart of the week #29: “Mgomo Baridi” – How much time do teachers actually spend teaching?

Teachers in Tanzania are often said to be on a “cold strike”- mgomo baridi. Not officially on strike, but seriously demotivated and not putting in anything like the amount of effort that the government expects of them. Some may be absent from their schools, others at school but not in the classroom. This is often cited as one reason why children are not learning as well as they should be.

But exactly how bad is the situation, and how does it compare with teachers in other countries? Continue reading

Chart of the week #28: If elections were held today, who would you vote for?

The latest Sauti za Wananchi survey brief was launched earlier today, on politics. It covers a range of topics, and I highly recommend reading the whole brief. But Angela Ambroz has put together this excellent graphic on the big issue: which potential presidential candidates have the most support?

There’s a lot in there, but the headline conclusion is clear:

A year before Tanzania’s next elections, the race is wide open.

Here’s the same data, this time in the form of the chart used in the Sauti brief:

Source: Sauti za Wananchi surveys

Source: Sauti za Wananchi surveys

Nobody has very strong support, the biggest single group of voters are those who “don’t know”.

Is that a sign that voters are uninspired by the options before them? It is clearly not a vote of confidence for any of the frontrunners for the CCM nomination, Lowassa, Membe and Pinda. Any one of them could win through, but there is also plenty of room for an outsider to step up.

Chart of the week #27: Public ratings of key institutions

From the same data source as last week, Pew Global Attitudes Survey, some data on how key institutions are viewed by the public in seven African countries.

I’m not going to draw any conclusions from the data this time – I will leave that to you. There are two ways to do it, in the two interactive charts below. Continue reading

Chart of the week #26: Corruption is seen as a “very big problem” by more Tanzanians than Nigerians

Pew Global Research have just published some new data from their Global Attitudes Survey, collected in early 2014. There were seven African countries among the sample, including Tanzania.

Let me start with a simple chart, with a conclusion that is perhaps surprising: More Tanzanians (90%) see corruption as a “very big problem” than in any of the other six African countries surveyed – more than in neighbouring countries, Kenya and Uganda, and more, even, than in Nigeria.

Pew problems Continue reading

Aid traceability is a worthy goal, but it will take some time

Cross posted from the blog of the UK-based aid transparency campaign organisation, Publish What You Fund. The original was published on October 20th. 


 


“We will require organisations receiving and managing funds from DFID to release open data on how this money is spent in a common, standard, reusable format. They will need to require this of sub-contractors and sub-agencies – right through the aid chain.”

That was Justine Greening, UK Secretary of State for International Development, speaking in 2012 on DFID’s commitment to transparency.

The UK’s latest Open Government Partnership Action Plan put a date on this, committing DFID to “a requirement of IATI publication by the end of 2015 for all implementing partners.”

The goal is traceability: for British taxpayers to be able to track the flow of funds from DFID in London to a handpump in rural Tanzania or a primary school in Nepal, even where the funds pass through several different organisations on the way. The International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI) and DFID’s Development Tracker website are the means to achieve this. Continue reading