The best of the gas cartoons

I’m claiming some credit for the first one, by Masoud Kipanya in todays Mwananchi:

Mwananchi, 9/7/14

Kipanya in Mwananchi, 9/7/14

And here’s why I’m claiming that credit:

And there are plenty more. Here’s another from Kipanya: “I wish we left our gas in the ground until the country reaches adolescence”. It’s a controversial view, but one I have heard many times:

Kipanya in Mwananchi, 8/7/14

Kipanya in Mwananchi, 8/7/14

Next up, from The Citizen:

King Kinya in The Citizen, 8/7/14

King Kinya in The Citizen, 8/7/14

And Majira:

Majira 7/7/14

Majira 7/7/14

Kipanya again, with another controversial view. “Lots more gas discovered / headaches begin slowly, slowly”:

Kipanya in Mwananchi, 20/6/14

Kipanya in Mwananchi, 20/6/14

From the (Tz) Guardian:

The Guardian 6/7/14

The Guardian 6/7/14

“Ever since I invested, I only get problems”, says the (mining) investor, on the (Tz) ITV website:

ITV (Tz) website, 4/7/14

ITV (Tz) website, 4/7/14

And finally, another from Kipanya:

Kipanya in Mwananchi, June 2014

Kipanya in Mwananchi, June 2014

 

3 thoughts on “The best of the gas cartoons

  1. Walimubora

    Ben,

    I’ve read your analysis and I am afraid that, as Tanzania with a love for objective reporting, research and analysis, your column has done little to further this debate around gas. Indeed, you may feel (and many maybe calling you a hero etc) that you have caught out the TPDC and government but in actual fact you are just a continuation of a history of young white men – often with PHDs?! – who come to Tanzania/Africa and “make a name for themselves” by “catching out governments” through rough back-of-the envolope non-scientific aanalysis assuming they are know alls. They assume that just because their are smart everyone else within government is stupid and are simply waiting to be taken advantage of.

    Folk like you don’t actually take a moment to consider there are men and women within TPDC and government who are quite rational and have arrived at these agreements through proper analysis as professionals. Instead of being the smart-white guy who views Tanzania (and Africa?) as “white mans burden” why not engage with the TPDC in a professional and non-emotive manner? Why not stop pushing the line loved by many in the west that Africans can’t reason or reach agreements rationally but, rather, will always require a white saviour like yourself to save them from victim hood?

    How about showing a bit of respect to a country like Norway who have stood by Tanzania through very dark days and years and stop belittling them by just conveniently assuming the gas agreement is them trying to “rape” Tanzania. Indeed,even if the gas deal is problematic, It is offensive and harsh to insinuate that Norway helped Tanzania so they can get favourable terms all these years later. Of all contries, to assume such a harsh motive on this country just shows how much your perspection of a “white saviour” is ingrained in your thinking.

    I respect your intellect and a lot of your analysis with Twaweza and beyond but this latest effort has really disappointed me and made me question why it is you are in Tanzania. I am afraid I am forced to come to a conclusion that you are there to further your professional opportunities and thus, in a way, doing exactly what the unfair gas deal you highlight does: furthering the interests of a whiteman at the expense of Africans. Shame on you. Jisahihishe and still to some professional ethics…if the matter concerns you so much please take time to research it properly instead of treating it as a subject of a 30 minute blog post. The welfare of a nation deserves such dignity and effort on your behalf.

    Regards,

    Zibotili

  2. Samwel

    Zibotili,

    I’m not going to take part in the discussion you’re bringing up with Ben, thus I’m only speaking for myself.

    First of all, you seem to respond through a racial statement which is not the case that Ben is talking about. Being a foreign investor doesn’t mean your white, that’s your prejudice and not fact. With that said it’s very important to take notice in what type of problem Ben is actually pointing out. This is not a new scenario, especially not within Africa, where government-corruption happens to be one of the key problems for the slow development of the continent. From my point of view you are taking a stand for at least foreign investors whom have proven themselves unconditionally to be out for no good (Richmond, Barrick Gold, Statoil). Make notice that most of them have been and are operating this way in many countries just like Tanzania. And that’s fact.

    But lets not get too cynical. From my point of view Ben is just tying to bring up a VERY IMPORTANT question from the dark. Every developing-country in the 21st century should have their economy as transparent as possible to avoid falling into bad trends.

    Samwel

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