Tag Archives: chart of the week

Charged numbers: access to electricity in Tanzania

off-grid-light

Mwananchi fp 120615In her budget speech to parliament yesterday, Minister of Finance, Saada Mkuya Salim, gave some positive figures on access to electricity in Tanzania. Between 2011 and 2014, she said, access to electricity increased from 7% to 36% (see page 44).

The figure made it onto the front page of Mwananchi newspaper.

Numbers that don’t sound plausible are worth checking out, especially when presented by politicians. So I decided to check the sources. Continue reading

One person, one vote? How many voters does each Tanzanian MP represent?

UPDATED 12/5/15 – See below

The job of an MP is to represent their constituents. But how many voters do they have to represent?

If there’s a big difference between the number of voters represented by different MPs, it can be unfair on MPs who have to represent a larger number of people. More importantly, it can be unfair on the voters. Those who live in constituencies with a smaller population would potentially have more influence over their MP – and therefore over the government as a whole. Those in constituencies with more voters would find it harder to make their voice heard. Continue reading

Tanzanian media on social media: who’s winning the battle for likes and followers?

UPDATED 6/5/15 – Now with corrected figures for Radio One, and the inclusion of the political cartoonist, Masoud Kipanya. 

Tanzanian media companies compete fiercely for readers, listeners and viewers. Increasingly, they battle for followers and likes in the social media space as well.

So who is winning?

I looked through a selection of Tanzania’s leading media companies, Swahili versions of some international media houses, and a few high profile individuals in the Tanzanian media sector. In each case, I looked at how many “likes” they had for their facebook page (if they have one), and how many followers for their twitter account (if they have one). Continue reading

Chart #40: What do Tanzanians think of media freedoms?

As usual, the latest release of Afrobarometer 2014 data and analysis on Tanzania has some very interesting findings. For advocates of media freedoms, it doesn’t make for very comfortable reading. And in a context where newspapers can (and have been) closed down, and where there are new restraints on space for public debate, this matters.

First, two charts that show a decline in support in Tanzania for having an independent and critical media since previous surveys in 2008 and 2012: Continue reading

Three (government) statistics that could be illegal under Tanzania’s new Statistics Act

Updated 11/4/15, with responses from the Big Results Now team and the Ministry of Water – see below.

Justin Sandefur of the Centre for Global Development (CGD), writing in the Washington Post, presented five charts that may soon be illegal in Tanzania. He was referring to the Statistics Act, recently passed by the Tanzanian parliament, which makes it a criminal offence to publish false statistics, or statistics “that may result in the distortion of facts.”. This is punishable by a minimum 10m/- ($6,000) fine and/or a minimum 3 year prison sentence.

Here, I have done something similar. But I only refer to statistics produced or cited by the Tanzanian government itself.

My purpose is not to accuse any particular part of the government of deliberately misleading people, but instead to point out some of the difficulties of making it an offence to publish false or distorting statistics. Continue reading

Chart #39: Interactive – Gender in Tanzania, from Tanzania Human Development Report

As I mentioned last week, the Tanzania Human Development Report has a wealth of interesting data tables, many of which have data broken down by region for the first time. I plan to explore this data over the next few weeks. To start, I have prepared a dashboard showcasing the report’s data on gender.

Specifically, this includes two things:

1. Analysis by region:

  • A Gender Development Index (GDI) score for each region of mainland Tanzania, based on the health, time spent in education, and living standards of women and men in each region. Along with the GDI score, I have included charts on each of the indicators that is used to calculate the GDI.
  • Women in decision making positions, by region. This gives the percentage of each region’s MPs, councillors and key officials (RCs, RASs, DCs, DASs) who are female and male.
  • You can choose which region to look at by selecting from the drop-down menu.

2. Analysis by indicator:

  • This shows GDI and Human Development Index (HDI) scores for each region, by gender along with scores for the component indicators that make up the HDI, and representation of women in various decision making groups.
  • Again, you can choose which indicators to look at using the drop-down menus.

Continue reading

Chart #38: The best and worst of the Tanzania Human Development Report 2014

The 2014 Tanzania Human Development Report was released last week. It’s been prepared by the Economic and Social Research Foundation (ESRF), with support from the UNDP.

It should be a fascinating document – the equivalent reports in the past have often been the best national-level summary of Tanzania’s progress towards Millennium Development Goals and Mkukuta targets – see this 2009 report, for example. But this time I was disappointed. In several important areas, the report has almost nothing to say. Continue reading