Tag Archives: education

Three (government) statistics that could be illegal under Tanzania’s new Statistics Act

Updated 11/4/15, with responses from the Big Results Now team and the Ministry of Water – see below.

Justin Sandefur of the Centre for Global Development (CGD), writing in the Washington Post, presented five charts that may soon be illegal in Tanzania. He was referring to the Statistics Act, recently passed by the Tanzanian parliament, which makes it a criminal offence to publish false statistics, or statistics “that may result in the distortion of facts.”. This is punishable by a minimum 10m/- ($6,000) fine and/or a minimum 3 year prison sentence.

Here, I have done something similar. But I only refer to statistics produced or cited by the Tanzanian government itself.

My purpose is not to accuse any particular part of the government of deliberately misleading people, but instead to point out some of the difficulties of making it an offence to publish false or distorting statistics. Continue reading

Chart #39: Interactive – Gender in Tanzania, from Tanzania Human Development Report

As I mentioned last week, the Tanzania Human Development Report has a wealth of interesting data tables, many of which have data broken down by region for the first time. I plan to explore this data over the next few weeks. To start, I have prepared a dashboard showcasing the report’s data on gender.

Specifically, this includes two things:

1. Analysis by region:

  • A Gender Development Index (GDI) score for each region of mainland Tanzania, based on the health, time spent in education, and living standards of women and men in each region. Along with the GDI score, I have included charts on each of the indicators that is used to calculate the GDI.
  • Women in decision making positions, by region. This gives the percentage of each region’s MPs, councillors and key officials (RCs, RASs, DCs, DASs) who are female and male.
  • You can choose which region to look at by selecting from the drop-down menu.

2. Analysis by indicator:

  • This shows GDI and Human Development Index (HDI) scores for each region, by gender along with scores for the component indicators that make up the HDI, and representation of women in various decision making groups.
  • Again, you can choose which indicators to look at using the drop-down menus.

Continue reading

Chart of the week #30: How well do teachers understand what they are teaching?

Last time we looked at data that showed how Tanzanian teachers really are on a “cold strike” (mgomo baridi). This time, a simple question: do teachers really understand what they are supposed to be teaching.

The same World Bank Service Delivery Indicators initiative asked grade 4 teachers (known as Standard 4 in Tanzania) in Kenya, Senegal, Tanzania and Uganda to take tests based on the primary school curriculum. Essentially, they were asking how well the teachers understand the subjects they are teaching. Continue reading

Chart of the week #29: “Mgomo Baridi” – How much time do teachers actually spend teaching?

Teachers in Tanzania are often said to be on a “cold strike”- mgomo baridi. Not officially on strike, but seriously demotivated and not putting in anything like the amount of effort that the government expects of them. Some may be absent from their schools, others at school but not in the classroom. This is often cited as one reason why children are not learning as well as they should be.

But exactly how bad is the situation, and how does it compare with teachers in other countries? Continue reading

Healer kills his child because she had been born in breech position

Tanzania Daima published a story last week about a remarkably unpleasant event that allegedly took place in Mpanda district, in the west of Tanzania. The reaction the story has generated within Tanzania demonstrates that the events described are not a typical / common occurrence. Nevertheless, I think it illustrates some wider interesting points, so I have translated the story in full. And make a few quick points below the translated article.

The original article is legally problematic, in that it potentially prejudices a pending legal case, (as do the Police Commander’s remarks), but that’s not the point I want to make here. Nevertheless, to avoid repeating the problem, I have changed or obscured the names of key participants and other identifying details in the translation.

Healer kills his child because she had been born in breech position

Source: Tanzania Daima, 2/9/2014 

Walter Mguluchuma

A fourteen-month-old baby, Consolata George, has been killed by her father, George Lubanga “Chuiwe”, 27, apparently because she was born in the breech position. Continue reading

Chart of the week #20: How valuable is education, and how expensive?

How do the public see the value of education across African countries?

The data comes from Gallup, a US-based opinion poll firm, this week. (Source: here and here).

There are three questions shown in the chart – select from the drop down menu to switch between them.

Some quick thoughts: Continue reading