Tag Archives: health

Chart #39: Interactive – Gender in Tanzania, from Tanzania Human Development Report

As I mentioned last week, the Tanzania Human Development Report has a wealth of interesting data tables, many of which have data broken down by region for the first time. I plan to explore this data over the next few weeks. To start, I have prepared a dashboard showcasing the report’s data on gender.

Specifically, this includes two things:

1. Analysis by region:

  • A Gender Development Index (GDI) score for each region of mainland Tanzania, based on the health, time spent in education, and living standards of women and men in each region. Along with the GDI score, I have included charts on each of the indicators that is used to calculate the GDI.
  • Women in decision making positions, by region. This gives the percentage of each region’s MPs, councillors and key officials (RCs, RASs, DCs, DASs) who are female and male.
  • You can choose which region to look at by selecting from the drop-down menu.

2. Analysis by indicator:

  • This shows GDI and Human Development Index (HDI) scores for each region, by gender along with scores for the component indicators that make up the HDI, and representation of women in various decision making groups.
  • Again, you can choose which indicators to look at using the drop-down menus.

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Chart of the week #34: Giving birth without safe water and sanitation

Let’s start with some headline statistics:

  • 43% of births in Tanzania take place at home
  • Of these, only 1.5% take place in settings with access to safe water and sanitation
  • Only 44% of health facilities that conduct deliveries have provision of safe water and sanitation facilities

And putting that all together:

  • Only 30% of births in Tanzania take place in an environment that includes access to safe water and sanitation.

These findings come from an analysis of data from the 2010 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) and the 2006 Service Provision Assessment, by researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, the World Health Organisation and Bugando Hospital.

Access to safe water and sanitation facilities seems like such a fundamental part of giving birth, wherever it happens. That only 30% of mothers in Tanzania have such access is pretty shocking.

But the researchers went further, to look at how access to a safe water and sanitation environment when giving birth varied across the country, and between richer and poorer Tanzanians. It turns out that the headline figures cover up some major differences.

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Chart of the week 31?: On the quality of health service provision

Teachers are on a cold strike, as we have seen, and many don’t have the level of knowledge of their subject matter that we would like. But what about health facility workers – nurses, clinical officers and doctors?

The same World Bank Service Delivery Indicators project has collected data on this as well, in the same four countries: Kenya, Senegal, Tanzania and Uganda. I’ve pulled out three indicators: health worker absenteeism, adherence to clinical guidelines, and diagnostic accuracy.

So what do these charts tell us?

  • Health worker absenteeism is worst in Uganda, where nearly half (46%) of health workers were found to be not present at the time of an unannounced visit.
  • In Tanzania, absenteeism is substantially higher in urban areas (33%) than rural (17%).
  • Senegal appears to have a bigger problem that the other three countries with the quality of services provided. Only 22% of health workers were found to be following clinical guidelines, and only a third (34%) of diagnostic tests were found to be accurate.
  • In all three East African countries, health workers are more likely to follow clinical guidelines in urban areas than rural. And the accuracy of diagnostic tests was also higher in urban areas.

Healer kills his child because she had been born in breech position

Tanzania Daima published a story last week about a remarkably unpleasant event that allegedly took place in Mpanda district, in the west of Tanzania. The reaction the story has generated within Tanzania demonstrates that the events described are not a typical / common occurrence. Nevertheless, I think it illustrates some wider interesting points, so I have translated the story in full. And make a few quick points below the translated article.

The original article is legally problematic, in that it potentially prejudices a pending legal case, (as do the Police Commander’s remarks), but that’s not the point I want to make here. Nevertheless, to avoid repeating the problem, I have changed or obscured the names of key participants and other identifying details in the translation.

Healer kills his child because she had been born in breech position

Source: Tanzania Daima, 2/9/2014 

Walter Mguluchuma

A fourteen-month-old baby, Consolata George, has been killed by her father, George Lubanga “Chuiwe”, 27, apparently because she was born in the breech position. Continue reading

Health check: How do Tanzania’s health services rate?

My colleagues on Twaweza’s Sauti za Wananchi mobile phone-based surveys are scaling up their output this year, in a big way. After the fascinating briefs they launched in last month on water supplies and the new constitution, they have a new one out today, on health services.

Tanzania has been making great strides on some health-related measures (notably malaria and child mortality), but has a long way to go in other areas. Sikika recently found, for example, that over 90% of public hospitals lacked essential medicines (pdf), and that there is a real problem in retaining doctors, with one survey reporting that 40% of graduate medical doctors were no long practising clinical medicine (pdf).

Back the Sauti brief, there are some very interesting findings: Continue reading