Tag Archives: human rights

On police brutality and the need for journalists to have “risk insurance”

Presidents Gauck and Kikwete, photo from Deutsche Welle

Presidents Gauck and Kikwete, photo from Deutsche Welle

I have several short extracts from today’s media for you.

First, from Deutche Welle, quoting German President Joachim Gauck, who is visiting Tanzania this week:

“What did our German forefathers see and feel, what hymns did they sing, when they first arrived in this place in the days of the Kaiser.” He was referring to the founding the colony of German East Africa.

I suppose it is a compliment, but colonial nostalgia is probably not the best way to win local popularity .

Now, lets turn to related, but more substantive matters. From Mtanzania:

President Gauck showered Tanzania in praise for how the country follows the rule of law, freedom of the press and protection of human rights.

He said he was satisfied with how Tanzania respects human rights and the pace of dealing with the problem of corruption. (1)

Continue reading

Chart of the week #24: Attacks on people with albinism across Africa

Witchcraft-related attacks on people with albinism are big news in Tanzania, and have been for some years. Back in 2008, Vicky Ntetema, then working for the BBC, first went undercover to investigate, and then into hiding after receiving threats.

Vicky is now the Executive Director for Tanzania of Under the Same Sun, campaigning for the rights of people with albinism. They recently published a report on the number of reported attacks on people with albinism across Africa.

Below, I have turned the data from their report into a map and two charts: Continue reading

“They should be beaten” has begun? A little incident in Ludewa

“Wapigwe tu”, said Tanzania’s Prime Minister, Mizengo Pinda, back in June – “They should be beaten.” He was responding a question prompted by the police response to protests in Mtwara region, but he made it clear that this was his attitude towards troublemakers everywhere.

“All those who are breaking the law will be beaten, and I insist that they should be beaten,”

There’s now a court case, accusing the Prime Minister of encouraging human rights abuses and disregarding the rule of law.

But has the Prime Minister’s statement had any effect on policing in practice? The police and other security services were hardly known for their restraint before he spoke.  Continue reading