Tag Archives: media freedom

On police brutality and the need for journalists to have “risk insurance”

Presidents Gauck and Kikwete, photo from Deutsche Welle

Presidents Gauck and Kikwete, photo from Deutsche Welle

I have several short extracts from today’s media for you.

First, from Deutche Welle, quoting German President Joachim Gauck, who is visiting Tanzania this week:

“What did our German forefathers see and feel, what hymns did they sing, when they first arrived in this place in the days of the Kaiser.” He was referring to the founding the colony of German East Africa.

I suppose it is a compliment, but colonial nostalgia is probably not the best way to win local popularity .

Now, lets turn to related, but more substantive matters. From Mtanzania:

President Gauck showered Tanzania in praise for how the country follows the rule of law, freedom of the press and protection of human rights.

He said he was satisfied with how Tanzania respects human rights and the pace of dealing with the problem of corruption. (1)

Continue reading

The Joy of Six: Highlights from Wikileaks’ release of Tz cables

Last week’s release by Wikileaks of the US Diplomatic Cables on Tanzania was not the “smoking gun” on the corruption scandals to have struck Tanzania in the last 5 years that some people were hoping for. But nor does it make for entirely comfortable reading for those in government who are subject to some unusually undiplomatic criticisms from the US diplomats. Continue reading

Who guards the guards? Scandal and corruption in the UK

For a keen follower of media issues, the past month was a great time to be visiting the UK. In case you missed it, a huge scandal blew up over illegal practices at the News of the World newspaper, which itself turned into a scandal about the amount of influence News International (the paper’s owners) had over the police and senior politicians. The result was what one respected media commentator described as a “revolution“.

I won’t recount the full story here as it is long enough to fill a book (or two), but I will try to cover the key points in brief before thinking about the story’s implications for the Tanzania media. Continue reading