Tag Archives: open data

A plan with (some) potential

Tanzania’s latest Open Government Partnership (OGP) Action Plan is now available, on the much-improved opengov.go.tz website. The plan covers the two years from July 2014 to June 2016.

The first action plan was a disappointment, with very few of the 25 commitments implemented. This time there are only five, but they are focussed and (mostly) ambitious:

1. Freedom of Information: To enact an FOI by December 2014.
2. Open Data: To establish an open data system by December 2016.
3. Budget Transparency: To make budget data (eight key budget reports), audit committee reports and tax exemptions publicly available by December 2014.
4. Land Transparency: Make land use plan, ownership and demarcated areas for large scale land deals accessible online for public use by June 2016.
5. Extractive Industries Transparency: Tanzania to fulfill its EITI commitments by June, 2015

The good points? Continue reading

Two opportunities for data lovers in Tanzania

The excellent School of Data, part of the Open Knowledge Foundation, have two great opportunities for Tanzanian data lovers.

First up, a Data Expedition focussed on water sector data, for anyone with an interest in data, or water, or both. The School of Data team will be helping people to play with water sector data, and to see what interesting stories they can find within it.

It on Friday June 6, from 9:30am to 16:00, at TANZICT’s BUNI Hub, in the COSTECH / Sayansi Building (see map). You can register for free here.

More details on the School of Data site, and on the TANZICT site.

Second, an opportunity to become a School of Data Fellow. They are looking for ten data analysts/activists, including one from Tanzania, to join a six-month fellowship programme. Fellows are expected to spend at least five days per month on the programme, which includes training and other events.

From the School of Data website:

The School of Data fellowship programme aims to to recruit and train the next generation of data leaders and trainers to magnify the reach of our data literacy programme. The fellows will provide training and ongoing support to journalists, civil society organisations, and individual change makers to use data effectively within their community and country.

More details are available here, and you can apply here. But if you are interested, or if you know anyone who might be, you need to hurry as the deadline for applications is just a few days away: June 10, 2014.

Talking ’bout a (data) revolution? Then let’s make it truly revolutionary

A version of this post was published on post2015.org, in their blog series, ‘What kind of ‘data revolution’ do we need for post-2015?’

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Don’t you know, they’re talking ’bout a revolution, sounds like a whisper;
Finally the tables are starting to turn, talking ’bout a revolution

Tracy Chapman

“We call for a data revolution,” said the report of the high-level panel on the post-2015 development agenda, “with a new international initiative to improve the quality of statistics and information available to citizens. We should actively take advantage of new technology, crowd sourcing, and improved connectivity to empower people with information on the progress towards the targets.”

As someone who works in the field of data and development, I find this idea exciting. But there seem to be a couple of problems with how it is being interpreted. Continue reading

Open (education) data: Supply, demand, and something in between

shule.info screenshot

shule.info screenshot

Shule.info is a fascinating new website that presents Tanzanian Form 4 exam results in some very interesting ways. It is potentially very useful to anyone with an interest in education in Tanzania – students, parents, teachers, local government, politicians, journalists and analysts.

Would you like to know how well your secondary school (or your child’s school) is performing? Would you like to compare exam results across different regions of Tanzania, to follow trends over time, or to see the effect of the adjustments made to 2012 exam results? If so, this site is for you. Launched (in beta) earlier this week, it has been put together by a group of young Tanzanian software developers, led by Arnold Minde, with some support from Twaweza. Continue reading