Tag Archives: policing

Translated excerpts from President Kikwete’s monthly address – on attacks against people with albinism

President Kikwete declined to receive the planned demonstration by the Tanzania Albinism Society (TAS) yesterday, which was then banned by the police. However, in his latest monthly address he spoke extensively on the topic. I have translated the key excerpts, which are pasted below. Continue reading

On police brutality and the need for journalists to have “risk insurance”

Presidents Gauck and Kikwete, photo from Deutsche Welle

Presidents Gauck and Kikwete, photo from Deutsche Welle

I have several short extracts from today’s media for you.

First, from Deutche Welle, quoting German President Joachim Gauck, who is visiting Tanzania this week:

“What did our German forefathers see and feel, what hymns did they sing, when they first arrived in this place in the days of the Kaiser.” He was referring to the founding the colony of German East Africa.

I suppose it is a compliment, but colonial nostalgia is probably not the best way to win local popularity .

Now, lets turn to related, but more substantive matters. From Mtanzania:

President Gauck showered Tanzania in praise for how the country follows the rule of law, freedom of the press and protection of human rights.

He said he was satisfied with how Tanzania respects human rights and the pace of dealing with the problem of corruption. (1)

Continue reading

“Elderly woman drops to earth while travelling in the air,” apparently

Mtanzania 310115

In Mtanzania today, a remarkable story, particularly when you note that this is a respectable newspaper, nothing like Sanian elderly woman apparently fell from the sky above Shinyanga.

The article doesn’t explain how she was “travelling through the air”, but it doesn’t need to: travelling by ‘ungo’ (flying basket) is a familiar concept in Tanzania. Fallen-from-the-sky stories appear fairly regularly in the press. Occasionally, they are told with some scepticism. But often, as in this case, they are told entirely at face value. Continue reading

Healer kills his child because she had been born in breech position

Tanzania Daima published a story last week about a remarkably unpleasant event that allegedly took place in Mpanda district, in the west of Tanzania. The reaction the story has generated within Tanzania demonstrates that the events described are not a typical / common occurrence. Nevertheless, I think it illustrates some wider interesting points, so I have translated the story in full. And make a few quick points below the translated article.

The original article is legally problematic, in that it potentially prejudices a pending legal case, (as do the Police Commander’s remarks), but that’s not the point I want to make here. Nevertheless, to avoid repeating the problem, I have changed or obscured the names of key participants and other identifying details in the translation.

Healer kills his child because she had been born in breech position

Source: Tanzania Daima, 2/9/2014 

Walter Mguluchuma

A fourteen-month-old baby, Consolata George, has been killed by her father, George Lubanga “Chuiwe”, 27, apparently because she was born in the breech position. Continue reading

Chart of the week #9: Killings due to witchcraft beliefs in Tanzania

How many people are killed each year in Tanzania due to witchcraft beliefs?

Source: Tanzania Human Rights Reports, 2010-2013

Source: Tanzania Human Rights Reports, 2010-2013

This chart is based on data from police reports and compiled in the annual Tanzania Human Rights Reports, published by the Legal and Human Rights Centre (LHRC). The latest report, covering 2013, was published a couple of weeks ago. Continue reading

“They should be beaten” has begun? A little incident in Ludewa

“Wapigwe tu”, said Tanzania’s Prime Minister, Mizengo Pinda, back in June – “They should be beaten.” He was responding a question prompted by the police response to protests in Mtwara region, but he made it clear that this was his attitude towards troublemakers everywhere.

“All those who are breaking the law will be beaten, and I insist that they should be beaten,”

There’s now a court case, accusing the Prime Minister of encouraging human rights abuses and disregarding the rule of law.

But has the Prime Minister’s statement had any effect on policing in practice? The police and other security services were hardly known for their restraint before he spoke.  Continue reading

Kamtafaruku! “Is that what you’re taught?”

I spotted this little anecdote at the end of a lengthy article on President Obama’s visit to Tanzania, in Habari Leo. I’ve abridged it slightly:

Earlier, harmony came close to breaking down in the Makumbusho area of Dar es Salaam, where a security official on the Tanzanian side got into a dispute with a member of Obama’s security team. Continue reading