Tag Archives: surveys

Charged numbers: access to electricity in Tanzania

off-grid-light

Mwananchi fp 120615In her budget speech to parliament yesterday, Minister of Finance, Saada Mkuya Salim, gave some positive figures on access to electricity in Tanzania. Between 2011 and 2014, she said, access to electricity increased from 7% to 36% (see page 44).

The figure made it onto the front page of Mwananchi newspaper.

Numbers that don’t sound plausible are worth checking out, especially when presented by politicians. So I decided to check the sources. Continue reading

Four bills later: is blogging with statistics in Tanzania now only for adrenalin junkies?

Nipashe, 25/3/15 - "Media Bills" under tight security

Nipashe, 25/3/15 – “Media Bills” under tight security

By Aidan Eyakuze and Ben Taylor *

At first we were excited. Tanzanian media and freedom of information advocates had been waiting for years for the Access to Information (ATI) and Media Services Bill, and the timetable for the latest parliamentary session included both. Were things finally moving?

The timetable also had bills on Statistics and Cybercrime. Was President Kikwete trying to push through a series of new laws before his time in office comes to an end later this year? He has played a leading role on the global stage on these issues, particularly through the Open Government Partnership (OGP), so perhaps this was an attempt to enshrine open government as his legacy.

Then we were concerned. Why were the ATI and Media Bills not available on the bunge website? Why were they being rushed through under certificates of urgency, severely limiting opportunities for consultation and debate? Continue reading

Chart of the week #22: Trying to explain the low turnout

Last week, I drew attention to the extremely low turnout figures recorded at the Tanzanian 2010 presidential election. This week, I thought I would look at whether these turnout figures vary between different sections of society.

For this, I have turned again to the 2012 Afrobarometer survey, which asked respondents whether or not they voted in 2010, and if not, why not.

Overall, 81% said they voted. This is much higher than the actual turnout as reported by the National Electoral Commission, which was 43%. And the Afrobarometer methodology explains that the survey included respondents from the age of 15 upwards. Given that only those aged 20 and above in 2012 would have been eligible to vote in 2010, that means a considerable portion of the Afrobarometer sample were not eligible in 2010. Continue reading

Chart of the week #12: Belief in witchcraft in Tanzania

How does belief in witchcraft in Tanzania compare with other countries?

Source: Pew Research Centre, data from 2010

Source: Pew Research Centre, data from 2010

Belief in all these things – witchcraft, curses, evil spirits, etc. – is not just stronger in Tanzania than in any of these other countries – it is much stronger in Tanzania:

Almost all Tanzanians (93%) believe in witchcraft, while less than half the population of Rwanda, Zambia, Uganda, Kenya and Ethiopia share that belief. Even in Nigeria, belief is much lower than in Tanzania.

Some questions, to which I don’t have the answer:

First, why is this the case? Why are Tanzanians apparently much more likely to believe in the supernatural than their neighbours in Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda and Zambia?

Second, what are the implications? What effects does this near-universal belief in witchcraft have on life in Tanzania – on politics, on business, on health, on education, etc? I posted a chart on witchcraft-related killings in Tanzania last month, but that’s only part of the story.

Third, what can be done about it?

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The charts are produced using data from 2010 (pdf – see pages 178-182), collected by the US-based Pew Research Centre, as part of their Religion and Public Life Project.

Long-term readers may note that I’ve published this chart before, when the Pew survey originally came out. But it’s such a startling conclusion that I felt it justifies being repeated.

Chart of the week #8: Democracy in Tanzania, according to Afrobarometer

More from the excellent Afrobarometer surveys this week, from the latest report on their 2012 surveys. The topic is democracy.

First, what is the demand for democracy in different parts of Africa? This chart shows the percentage of people in each country who said both that they support democracy and that they reject authoritarian alternatives (authoritarian rule, military, one-party state): Continue reading

Chart of the Week #1: Tanzanians’ views on natural resource management

Tz views on gas

Source: World Bank blog, using data from Twaweza’s Sauti za Wananchi initiative, rounds 9 and 11.

Highlights from Jacques Morriset’s post on the World Bank blog, based on data from Twaweza’s Sauti za Wananchi initiative:

  • Around three quarters of the respondents have heard about the discoveries of natural gas, and yet every two out of three would wish to be provided with more information.
  • While 28 percent are aware that benefits from the large off-shore gas reserves will take time to materialize, 36 percent believe that gas companies are already earning money from these resources. Continue reading

“Someone is shortchanging our children. We must refuse to put up with it.”

Tanzania Daima described it as “a national disaster“. Illiteracy haunts public school pupils,” was the Daily News headline. The Citizen wrote of “literacy shame” and “primary education in a mess“.

They are talking about the latest set of Uwezo results, which came out this week for Tanzania, and a week earlier for Uganda. For those who are unfamiliar, Uwezo is a large annual survey of primary school-age children in Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda, asking them to complete short tests in English, Swahili and numeracy, based on Standard 2 curriculum. The idea is to see whether children are actually learning in school, rather than simply whether they are attending school. The latest reports are for surveys carried out in 2012, and the results are not good. Continue reading