Tag Archives: WaterAid

Interactive – mapping water and sanitation access in Africa

My old colleagues at WaterAid have put together this interesting map of water and sanitation access across Africa. It shows trends in access to clean and safe water and improved sanitation by country.

Slide the year slider across below the map to see how access has changed since 1990. Or click on a country to see a simple chart showing progress since 1990, and what is needed to achieve universal access by 2030.

Click on Tanzania in particular, to see line on the chart going downwards – access to clean and safe water in Tanzania has declined since 1990.

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Further reading:

The world is doing well on water supply, but leaving Tanzania behind

Globally, the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) for water supply has been met. A new report from UN Water, UNICEF and the World Health Organisation, launched this week, reported that 89% of the world’s population now has access to water from an improved source. This has quite rightly been a cause for celebration and media coverage (see here and here from the (UK) Guardian, and from the BBC), a rare good news story.

But here in Tanzania, we can’t share in the celebrations. Continue reading

“Undertaking” Tanzania’s Water Sector Development Programme?

I spent two days last week at the annual Joint Water Sector Review meeting – the so-called “highlight” of the annual calendar of “dialogue”. This was the sixth such meeting to be held – and I have the “distinction” of having attended all of them. But as you can probably guess from the profusion of “inverted commas” in this paragraph, I’m having serious doubts about the whole exercise. Before I come to that, though, let me give you some background.

Around 250 people from the Ministry of Water, other related government ministries and agencies, the “development partners” and civil society all attended, in the workshop factory that is Ubungo Plaza. All the main stakeholders were there. Apart from water consumers that is, who are only represented in the sense that everyone consumes water. And those consumers (or perhaps I should call them citizens) weren’t represented by their official representatives either – no MPs or local councillors attend, with the exception of the Ministers officiating at the formal opening and closing sessions. We civil society folks had to take on that role. Continue reading

Water and sanitation in Tanzania’s Poverty and Human Development Reports

I prepared the chapters on water and sanitation for the 2007 and 2009 Poverty and Human Development Reports for Tanzania.

The 2007 report did not really cover any new ground, but the 2009 report included an analysis of household wealth, access to clean and safe water, and the percentage of household income that is spent on water supply: Continue reading

Out of sight and out of mind? Are marginalised communities overlooked in decision making

Out of sight and out of mind? was Tanzania’s second annual water sector equity report, published in September 2009. I wrote most of the report, with the exception of the section on water resource management.

This time, the most interesting analysis was qualitative, looking to explain why district’s were targeting most of their water sector funding at relatively well-served communities. (This had been a major finding of the previous year’s report.) In particular, we looked at two wards in Nzega district, Mwakashanhala and Itobo, asking why Itobo, which already had reasonably good access to clean and safe water, continued to benefit from new funding, while Mwakashanhala, which had no improved waterpoints, didn’t get any funding.  Continue reading

Comprehensive review of performance monitoring in Tanzania’s water sector

I wrote this report on performance monitoring in Tanzania’s water sector for WaterAid, following a request from the Ministry of Water. It was intended to review the existing monitoring frameworks and systems, and to propose how these could be improved.

It’s a very detailed and technical analysis of performance monitoring systems, interesting only to those with a deep interest in the field.

Management for sustainability

Management for sustainability: practical lessons from three studies on the management of rural water supply schemes was the rather unwieldy title for a paper summarising three studies on the same topic for WaterAid Tanzania. It was published in June 2009, alongside a rather more accessible and catchy briefing paper: Addressing the Sustainability Crisis. Continue reading